Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Vishnu | 23” x 31 Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Shankar | 24” x 34” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Shivaji Bhawani (OF) | 14” x 11” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Setu Bandhan (OF) | 15” x 11” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Rama Sagara Darpa Haran (OF) | 20” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Lakshmi - Saraswati (OF) | 21” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Divne Swing (OF) | 21” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Dhruva Narayana (OF) | 15” x 11” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Dashratha Kaikaya (OF) | 20” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Damayanti (OF) | 15” x 11” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Vishwavirat Swarupam (OF) | 30” x 22” Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Shree Suryanarayan 1 (OF) | 15” x 11 Raja Ravi Varma Oleograph | Shree Suryanarayan 2 (OF) | 15” x 11 Adi Laxmi 7 (OF) (G.V. Venkateshwara Rao) | Oleographs | 22” x 16” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Ahilya (NF) | 19” x 15”<br />
Ahalya emerged from the Milky - ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain to obtain the divine Elixir (Amirtham). As she was extremely beautiful, Lord Indra and sage Gauthama wanted to marry her. But in the test conducted by Brahma between them, Gautama became successful and married her. They lived happily for some years in the forest hermitage.
<br />
Ahalya is leaning against a tree in the forest drying her loose hair, with a small flower basket in her hand, evidently carrying the collected flowers for the daily rituals for her husband.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Arjun Subhadra (OF) | 21” x 12”<br />
Arjun was one of the Pandava brothers. He resorted to pilgrimage as a penance, since he violated the agreement between his brothers regarding their consort Draupathi.
<br />
After visiting many sacred places, in the guise of a sage (sanyasi) to avoid revealing his identity, Arjuna reached Dwaraka where Krishna was ruling. Subadhra was the younger sister of Krishna, proposed to be married to Duryodhana. But Subadhra, having heard about Arjuna's appearance, skill in archery, etc., started liking him even before seeing him.
<br />
Krishna came to know about Arjuna's wish of marrying Subadhra, arranged for their marriage in secrecy, in the presence of his parents. The scene depicts Arjuna in the disguise of a sage, caressing Subadhra after the disclosure of his identity.<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Dattatreya 2 (OF) | 21” x 16” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Ganapathi (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Ganapathi or Ganesh was created by Parvathi, the consort of Shiva, out of turmeric mould to guard the entrance of their abode in Kailash, as she needed privacy. He is God of wisdom, fortune and spiritual success. He destroys all hindrances, impediments of man and paves way to 'success and intelligence' (Siddhi, Ridhi), symbolic of his powers to bestow success and divine intelligence to man. His calm, tranquil nature represents the conquest of animality which is transformed into spirituality. The rat is his vehicle. 
<br />
He is with an elephant head having a single tusk, a trunk that is gracefully curled over the belly and four arms. He embodies the power and wisdom of elephant and mobility as the swiftness of mouse. He is seated embracing both the wives, while Siddhi is clasping him, Ridhi is engrossed in deep reflections. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Gangavatharan (OF) | 21” x 16”<br />
King Bhagiratha was the son of King Dilipan. His ancestors were cursed and burnt to death by the great sage Kapila for their sins. Their souls were in purgatory and could not go to Heavens. It was told that their souls could be purified only by the holy water of the Ganges which was in Heaven. Bhagiratha's grandfather Amsuman and father Dilipan did penances in vain to bring Ganges to earth. But Bhagiratha did austere penance for many years, as a result the Ganges agreed to descend to earth.
<br />
But the forces of the mighty torrents of the Ganges could not be borne by earth. To prevent such disaster and catastrophe, Bhagiratha once again dis penance on Shiva. Shiva was pleased and agreed to receive the pouring torrents of the Ganges on his head and shoulders.
<br />
The Ganges is flowing in the form of maiden Ganga Devi and Shiva is standing firm on the rocks with his head looking up and neck thrown backwards. His consort Parvathi and Bhagiratha are watching the thrilling scene with anxiety.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Gangavatharan (PM) | 20” x 14”<br />
King Bhagiratha was the son of King Dilipan. His ancestors were cursed and burnt to death by the great sage Kapila for their sins. Their souls were in purgatory and could not go to Heavens. It was told that their souls could be purified only by the holy water of the Ganges which was in Heaven. Bhagiratha's grandfather Amsuman and father Dilipan did penances in vain to bring Ganges to earth. But Bhagiratha did austere penance for many years, as a result the Ganges agreed to descend to earth.
<br />
But the forces of the mighty torrents of the Ganges could not be borne by earth. To prevent such disaster and catastrophe, Bhagiratha once again dis penance on Shiva. Shiva was pleased and agreed to receive the pouring torrents of the Ganges on his head and shoulders.
<br />
The Ganges is flowing in the form of maiden Ganga Devi and Shiva is standing firm on the rocks with his head looking up and neck thrown backwards. His consort Parvathi and Bhagiratha are watching the thrilling scene with anxiety.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Garuda Vishnu (PM) | 20” x 14” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Hari Har Bhet (NF) | 19” x 15”<br />
Among the two major divisions of Hinduism; Hari (Vishnu), the preserver of the Universe, is God of Vaishnavism and Shiva (Haran), the destroyer of the Universe. Though devotees see differences between these two Gods, the wise find no difference. 
<br />
To express the unity between these two sects, Hari and Haran with their consorts Lakshmi and Parvathi, are illustrated as meeting each other. The artist’s representation of the fusion of the heads of elephant and bull is noteworthy. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Indrajeet Vijay 1 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Meghanada was the son of Ravana the Asura king of Lanka. He was as valiant as his father in all martial arts. Ravana, after obtaining the boon from Lord Brahma that he would not be killed by any God or Demigods like Devas, Gandharwas, Vasus and some others became very powerful, because to ravage many kingdoms and even the netherworld (Bathalalokha).
Ravana wished to reign over Indralokha which is ruled by Lord Indra. He waged war against Indra and other Devas along with his son Meghanada, Maricha, Kumbakarna and the other Asura forces. The fierce battle continued for many days causing heavy loss of life on both the sides. Meghanada resorted to the art of Samadhi, became invisible and shot arrows.
<br />
In the duel between Indra and Ravana, Meghanada in order to help his father leaped into Indra's chariot, bound him and took him as prisoner to Lanka. Indra was chained to the foot of the flagshaft and dragged as war prisoner. As Meghanada was victorious over Indra, he came to be called Indrajit by Lord Brahma.
<br />
In the palace of Ravana, Indra is seen with bowed head, an Apsara brought from Indralokha is held by an Asura attendant. Beneath the canopy is Ravana and his wife Mandodari is seen behind. Indrajit is with a bow and spear in his hand. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Indrajeet Vijay 2 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Meghanada was the son of Ravana the Asura king of Lanka. He was as valiant as his father in all martial arts. Ravana, after obtaining the boon from Lord Brahma that he would not be killed by any God or Demigods like Devas, Gandharwas, Vasus and some others became very powerful, because to ravage many kingdoms and even the netherworld (Bathalalokha).
Ravana wished to reign over Indralokha which is ruled by Lord Indra. He waged war against Indra and other Devas along with his son Meghanada, Maricha, Kumbakarna and the other Asura forces. The fierce battle continued for many days causing heavy loss of life on both the sides. Meghanada resorted to the art of Samadhi, became invisible and shot arrows.
<br />
In the duel between Indra and Ravana, Meghanada in order to help his father leaped into Indra's chariot, bound him and took him as prisoner to Lanka. Indra was chained to the foot of the flagshaft and dragged as war prisoner. As Meghanada was victorious over Indra, he came to be called Indrajit by Lord Brahma.
<br />
In the palace of Ravana, Indra is seen with bowed head, an Apsara brought from Indralokha is held by an Asura attendant. Beneath the canopy is Ravana and his wife Mandodari is seen behind. Indrajit is with a bow and spear in his hand. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Keechaka Sairendri (OF) | 21” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Krishna (OF) | 15” x  11” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Krishna Leela (NF) | 29” x 23”<br />
Krishna’s early childhood and adolescence were spent in Brindavan. He lived with his foster parents NandaGopa and Yasodha. The cowherd women called Gopis were very friendly with Krishna, lived always in the consciousness of him. Most of the Gopis in their previous lives were great sages, who wanted to enjoy the close association of God, which was satisfied in the advent of Krishna.
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This scene shows Krishna's playful activities (Leela) with Gopikas. Krishna picked up the clothes of Gopis who were bathing in the Kalindhi River. He climbed up a tree and began to play on the flute, later returned the clothes when they came out of the river.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 1 (OF) | 22” x 16”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 2 (OF) | 22” x 15”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 3 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 4 (NF) | 36” x 29”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 5 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 6 (NF) | 28” x 23”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Lakshmi 11 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Laxmi (PM) | 20” x 14”<br />
Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu, the preserver of the universe. She is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, representing the luxuriance of the world. She is believed to have sprung from the Milky-ocean, when the Devas and the Asuras churned it with the Mandara Mountain, using the snake Vasuki as rope in the churning process. 
<br />
She is riches personified, who is the seat of beauty, compassion, welfare, peace and all the goodness. In vaikuntha their abode, she is engaged in the service of Her Lord Vishnu. She is the glory of Heaven.
<br />
Lakshmi is standing on beautifully bloomed pink lotus in water. She is holding a lotus flower in each of her hands. The right hand is offering benedictions and boons (varada mudra) and the left hand bestows divine protection (abhaya mudra). By the side of the following steam is the thick green foliage of shrubs and trees.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Manini (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Portrait of a lady who is vainglorious about her beauty and appearance. Manini meaning one who is conceited <br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Marken Daya (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Markandeya was born to sage Mirukandu and Maruthuvathi, after prolonged meditation of the sage on Lord Shiva at Kasi for a child. Shiva gave him the boon of a virtuous male child who would only live up to sixteen years. Markandeya was born, grew up to a lad of sixteen years, well versed in all scriptural texts.
After knowing the reason for the anguish of his parents about his short span of life, he went to Kasi and sat before the Shivlinga in deep meditation. Yamah, the Lord of Death, came near him, threw the rope of bobdage on him to take his life off. Markandeya embraced the Shivalinga tightly. She furiously emerged out of the Linga, spurned Yamah with his left leg, pierced him with the trident which made him run away. Shiva offered the boon that Markandeya would eternally live young as a lad of sixteen years of age.
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Shiva emerges from the Shivalinga with extreme wrath on His face, Yamah mounted on his vehicle the buffalo, obeisance to Shiva in fear.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Mohini (PM) | 14” x 10”<br />
Mohini or the Temptress, as revealed in the Hindu puranic episodes, is a female spirit who would haunt young, unmarried men. She is believed to be eternally young, beautiful and alluring. She would be roaming in the solitary places in search of young men, would always be clad in white saree with loose hair.
<br />
In this marvellous scene, Mohini is playing on a swing, hung from a single tall tree in a solitary meadow. The panoramic background landscape is exquisitely portrayed.

<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Mohini 1 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Mohini or the Temptress, as revealed in the Hindu puranic episodes, is a female spirit who would haunt young, unmarried men. She is believed to be eternally young, beautiful and alluring. She would be roaming in the solitary places in search of young men, would always be clad in white saree with loose hair.
<br />
In this marvellous scene, Mohini is playing on a swing, hung from a single tall tree in a solitary meadow. The panoramic background landscape is exquisitely portrayed.

<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Mohini 2 (PM) | 20” x 14”<br />
Mohini or the Temptress, as revealed in the Hindu puranic episodes, is a female spirit who would haunt young, unmarried men. She is believed to be eternally young, beautiful and alluring. She would be roaming in the solitary places in search of young men, would always be clad in white saree with loose hair.
<br />
In this marvellous scene, Mohini is playing on a swing, hung from a single tall tree in a solitary meadow. The panoramic background landscape is exquisitely portrayed.

<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Mohini 3 (NF) | 25” x 19”<br />
Mohini or the Temptress, as revealed in the Hindu puranic episodes, is a female spirit who would haunt young, unmarried men. She is believed to be eternally young, beautiful and alluring. She would be roaming in the solitary places in search of young men, would always be clad in white saree with loose hair.
<br />
In this marvellous scene, Mohini is playing on a swing, hung from a single tall tree in a solitary meadow. The panoramic background landscape is exquisitely portrayed.

<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Padmini (OF) | 20” x 13”<br />
Vatsayana in his work Kamasutra deals with four types of women. They are; Padmini or Lotus woman, Chitrini or Art woman, Sankhini or Conch woman and Hatsini or Elephant woman. Padmini type of woman is ideal in beauty like the padma or lotus. Her face is pleasing at the full moon, body soft as mustard flowers, skin fair as the yellow lotus, eyes are bright and beautiful as the orbs of the fawn. She walks with the gait if a swan, her voice is low and musical as that of the skylark. She delights in fine jewellery and the rich dresses. She eats little, sleeps slightly. She is religious, respectful, courteous and clever. 
<br />
Padmini is elegantly standing in the pond filled with lotus flowers. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Ram Panchayatan (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Rama became the king of Ayodhya after completing fourteen years life of banishment, imposed by his step mother Kaikeyi, along with Sita and Lakshmana. Bharata was anointed the crown prince, Lakshmana commander-in-chief and Shatrugna became the Finance Minister. Rama was munificent in offering gifts of gold coins, jewellery and cattle to the people. He used to go about the country in disguise to inquire about the welfare, displeasure of his subjects. Nobody had any fear of enemies or thieves. The country overflowed with all food stuffs including milk and honey Dispensation of justice was impartially rendered by Rama.
<br />
Sri Rama is seated on the throne with Sita on his left thing. All his three brothers Lakshmana, Bharata and Shatrugna are standing close to him.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Ram Panchayatan (PM) | 20” x 14”<br />
Rama became the king of Ayodhya after completing fourteen years life of banishment, imposed by his step mother Kaikeyi, along with Sita and Lakshmana. Bharata was anointed the crown prince, Lakshmana commander-in-chief and Shatrugna became the Finance Minister. Rama was munificent in offering gifts of gold coins, jewellery and cattle to the people. He used to go about the country in disguise to inquire about the welfare, displeasure of his subjects. Nobody had any fear of enemies or thieves. The country overflowed with all food stuffs including milk and honey Dispensation of justice was impartially rendered by Rama.
<br />
Sri Rama is seated on the throne with Sita on his left thing. All his three brothers Lakshmana, Bharata and Shatrugna are standing close to him.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Ram Rajyabhishekha (PM) | 20” x 14” Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati (OF) | 15” x 11”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati 2 (NF) | 23” x 29”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati 3 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati 4 (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati 5 (NF) | 35” x 27”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Saraswati 6 (NF) | 29” x 23”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> G.V. Venkateshwara Rao | Oleograph | Saraswati (NF) |21” x 15”<br />
Saraswathi is the Goddess of learning and wisdom. She is consort of Brahma, the creator of the universe, is the presiding deity of all the sixty-four types of arts including the fine arts music, dance, painting, sculpture and building architecture. It is believed that she is reading eternally to denote the learning never comes to an end.
<br />
Saraswathi is seated cross-legged on a small rock by the side of a running stream, showing refinement. She is seen playing on the musical instrument veena, the finest music originates from Her. She is holding a traditional palm leaf manuscript. The divine beauty of Saraswathi is arresting and beyond description.
<br />
Her white saree symbolises that wisdom is pure and unalloyed. Usually she would be associated with her vehicle white swan but here with the peacock. 
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Shakuntala Janma (OF) | 21” x 15”<br />
Vishwamitra, a king turned ascetic (Rishi), did austere penance for many years on Lord Brahma, to attain the most arduous and highest status of sages called BrahmaRishi from him. She in disguise, lured him with all her charms and baby Shakuntala was born. When Indra wanted to take back Menaka to his abode 
Indralokha, Vishwamitra having come to know about the treacherous act of Menaka and Indra, bluntly refused to accept the new born baby and left them to continue his penance.
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The novel and dramatic pose of Vishwamitra expressing utmost negation with stern determination is noteworthy. Menaka pleads with him to take care of the child, as she can’t take Shakuntala to her celestial abode.
<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Shakuntala Patralekhan (NF) | 15” x 19”<br />
Shakuntala was brought up in the ashram of sage Kanva. Once when he was away from his hermitage, she met king Dushyanta, who came for hunting in the forest and they both fell in love at first sight. King Dushyanta married her in the forest itself without the consent of Kanva (Gandharva Vivah). He presented her the signet ring as a token of his love. After being with her for some time, left for the kingdom, promising to take her to the palace as his queen. Since the king did not return as promised, she was pining all the time.
Reclining in a contemplative mood, Shakuntala is writing a love letter to Dushyanta on a lotus leaf, her two friends Priyamvada and Anusuya are seated close to her. The dense deep forest is realistically illustrated with her pet deer Dirghabanga standing at a distance. 
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N. B. – Deviating from the epics and the puranas, this was the first painting done by Ravi Varma in 1876, based on Indian on Indian classical literature ‘Shakuntalam’ by the great Sanskrit poet Kalidasa.<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Shivaji Maharaj (OF) | 15” x 10”<br />
Shivaji was born to Shahaji Raje and Jijabai at Shivneri in Maharashtra on 19th February 1627. Shahaji was a brave warrior under Adilshah, the sultan of Bijapur. Shivaji was entrusted to the care of great preceptor Dadaji Konda Deo of Bijapur who imparted good education, training in archery, horse riding, etc. His mother Jijabai while narrating the heroic stories of the epics instilled in him the craving to fight for the liberation of the Marathas from the alien rulers of  Bijapur sultan and the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb at Delhi.
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When Konda Deo was appointed as the collector of Poona by the sultan, Shivaji had an opportunity to see his country's expanse. At Poona by the sultan, Shivaji had an opportunity to see his country's expanse. At Poona he gathered a band of devoted followers who were given training in war skills. He started capturing forts after forts like Torna, Raigad, Purander, Panhala, etc., by the coup, as Konda Deo did not intervene in the deeds. The sultan was annoyed and his commander Afzal Khan imprisoned Shivaji's father. In the treacherous plot of Afzal Khan to kill Shivaji, it was Shivaji who killed Afzal Khan.
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When Surat was attacked by Shivaji, the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb sent Raja Jai Singh to defeat Shivaji. Jaisingh through a ruse entrapped Shivaji and his son Sambhaji as prisoners in Agra palace. Shivaji ingeniously escaped with his son in sweet baskets.
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Shivaji became the crowned Monarch of Maharashtra in the coronation ceremony at Raigadh.<br /> Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Sita Syavaywar (PM) | 20” x 14” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Sushila (OF) | 21” x 15” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Uluchi Arjuna (PM) | 20” x 14” Raja Ravi Varma | Oleograph | Vishwamitra Tapobhang (PM) | 20” x 14”<br />
Rambha is the most beautiful and celebrated danseuse of Indralokha, ruled by Lord Indra. Once sage Vishwamitra did austere penance for many years on Lord Brahma, for getting the greatest honour of Brahma Rishi from him. Indra wanted to distract the sage from his abstemious penance and getting the boon. So he deputed Rambha to entice Vishwamitra by her beauty. Though she was aware of the sage's extreme, uncontrollable rage and power of cursing, accepted the task.
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During spring season, when plants and trees bloomed, Rambha descended to earth accompanied by Manmada-the God of love and Indra in the form of skylark. The skylark began to sing, Manmada shot the arrows of love on Vishwamitra, Rambha danced practicing all her tricks of seduction.
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Vishwamitra distracted from the penance, opened his eyes. He could infer that it was Indra who had sent the beautiful damsel to entice him. He cursed her to b the transformed into a rock, remain in that form for a thousand years till the Brahmin Bhuritejas came to redeem her. Indra and Manmada fled to escape from curse. Vishwamitra later repented from having given vent to his anger.<br />
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